n-word in the news

I’m not going to write about this. I will leave that to Under the News, where the topic is covered very well.

Mayor wants Brazoria to outlaw the ‘n-word’
He says small town should fine ‘offensive’ uses of the racial slur

— reported by the Houston Chronicle

Brazoria Mayor Ken Corley wants offensive use of the “n-word” to be punishable by a fine of up to $500 in his town.

“It’s not a particular problem in Brazoria,” Corley said, “but it’s a national problem.”

[snip]

He said if the ordinance passes, he may ask for it to be expanded to include other racial slurs.

He believes Brazoria would be the first place in the country where the racial slur would be outlawed. But at least one legal expert said Monday that such an ordinance may not stand up in court.

The ordinance wouldn’t forbid anyone from saying the word, Corley said, but would outlaw using the word in an offensive or aggressive manner. Violators would be charged with disturbing the peace, he said.

[snip]

Author: Paloma Cruz

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4 thoughts on “n-word in the news”

  1. Mr. Corley:
    I think the mayor could find more important things to do than to outlawing a word that many people even “African-Americans” use. Out here in “progressive” California we just had 10 young “N-” excuse me”, “African-Americans” get off virtually scott-free (probation only) for a very violent attack on 3 young white girls in the Bixby Knolls area of Long Beach, California on Halloween night 2006. The judge, Gibson Lee, in the juvenile justice system in Los Angeles County had complete access to the police and school records to the 10 black perpetrators and knew they had been in trouble before yet still gave all of them probation anyway. I am incensed and infuriated. This judge should impeached and these “N-“, excuse me “African-Americans” should go to prison at least they are 25 years old. And no, I think outlawing this word is a waste of time, especially when IT DESCRIBES SOME PEOPLE SO WELL!!

  2. I find myself in the weird position of taking exception with almost everything you wrote and having to agree with something buried deep in there: “I think the mayor could find more important things to do than to outlawing a word…” (and then we part ways).

    The unfortunate truth is that, assuming the intention was good, it’s not going to work. It’s not going to work because outlawing the word won’t stop its use. It’s not going to work because outlawing the word won’t stop the sentiment behind it. It’s not going to work because outlawing the word won’t improve the attitude of people who actually believe in the worst possible definition of it.

    As for the rest of what you wrote… um… oookkkaayyyy…. how the he** do I respond to that? The tone and what I assume is the sentiment behind the comment is, in fact, a case in point on why the word should be erased altogether. Your comment, and (again), the sentiment behind it, is also an example of why just getting rid of the word would never be enough. Let’s just agree to disagree on outlooks.

    The American justice system is in no way perfect. However, and I write this as someone who has never spent a day in jail or knownanyone who has, the suggestion that it is in some way lenient on African-Americans is so laughable I can’t even address it. Tell me that justice is for sale in the United States, that if you have the money to buy a dozen lawyers you can get away with murder — I’ll agree with you. Tell me that famous people get away with things that nobodies are crucified for, and I’ll agree with you. But tell me that criminals are getting away with crimes BECAUSE they are African-American, and I have to once again disagree.

    Back to the original topic, I applaud the reported intent of this proposal. However, it’s very misguided and will never work.

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